Marijuana Has No Legit Medical Use, Feds Say; New SoCal Study Calls B.S.

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Uncle Sam still doesn’t recognize pot as medicine. In fact, under U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration rules, it’s considered worse than cocaine: Cannabis is a top, “Schedule I” outlaw, which means it has “no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and there is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or other substance under medical supervision.”
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Gary Johnson Tells Feds To Leave Medical Marijuana To The States

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On Monday former New Mexico Governor and current Libertarian Presidential candidate Gary Johnson was in Colorado, and took the opportunity to reiterate the way he thinks medical marijuana should be treated by the federal government. His campaign out out a press release on the event in Denver: Read more


In Rare Bi-partisan Move, State Legislators Back Fund to Support New Mexico Medical Marijuana Program

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(Santa Fe) – Midway through the 2012 Legislative Session, a bill aimed at protecting thousands of sick New Mexicans’ legal right to the most appropriate medication to relieve their symptoms and suffering has been introduced by Senator Cisco McSorley (D) and signed on by Senator Rod Adair (R), Senator Gerald Ortiz y Pino (D), and Senator John Ryan (R). Senate Bill 240 creates a Medical Marijuana Fund sustained by the producer and patient production licensing fees currently being collected by the Department of Health. The Department of Health will be able to use these funds to directly administer the program. Read more


NM’s medical marijuana program flourishing

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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — More than 1,000 New Mexicans have applied for medical marijuana licenses since Republican Gov. Susana Martinez took office in January, prompting the administration that had advocated repeal of the law to instead propose taking the program outside of the public health department. Read more


Marijuana May Be Studied for Combat Disorder

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For years now, some veterans groups and marijuana advocates have argued that the therapeutic benefits of the drug can help soothe the psychological wounds of battle. But with only anecdotal evidence as support, their claims have yet to gain widespread acceptance in medical circles.
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